National Institute for Healthcare Education
Newsletters > NIHE Talks Health November 2012
NIHE Talks Health November 2012

Nov 29, 2012

NIHE TALKS HEALTH—November 2012*
www.nationalhearted.com
*Look for the coupon at the bottom of this newsletter good for $20 off any ACLS class registered on our website. Good for any registration placed before Dec. 7, 2012.
In this issue:
1.    2013 Schedule of Classes posted on our website: www.nationalhearted.com Register NOW!!
2.   2 New Online ACLS Prep Courses: “ECG for Everyone” and “Underlying Causes of Cardiac Arrest”. Get Instant CE when done ONLINE!
3.   FREE CE course: “Water, Dehydration, and Risk for Chronic Disease” Back by popular demand.
4.   ACLS and PALS Prep courses. Get CE credit and be fully prepared for your ACLS or PALS class! See Dr. Stonebraker lecture live in our video based classes!
5.   Link to 2010 Guideline Summary
6.   November’s Coupon good for $20 off ALL ACLS classes registered online in before Dec. 7, 2012
2013 Schedule of Classes is here!!
Go to www.nationalhearted.com and check out the Register Now pages. Click on your area and you will be taken to the registration page with all the new dates. Our calendar pages are still being updated but the Register Now pages are done for 2013!
Is Your AHA ACLS, PALS, BLS, or NRP due to expire or do you need the full Provider class? We have lots of NO STRESS classes throughout California everyday as well as, the only AHA online BLS, AHA online ACLS, and AHA online PALS that will get you an AHA card.
Upcoming ACLS, PALS, BLS, & NRP classes in: San Francisco, CA; Sacramento, CA; Loma Linda/Colton, CA, Torrance, CA, Fremont, CA; Walnut Creek, CA; Vacaville, CA; Culver City, CA; Pasadena, CA; San Jose, CA; Sherman Oaks, Ca; & Burbank, CA. Check out our website: www.nationalhearted.com for dates and times. Always get your AHA card the day you complete the class.
Is Your AHA ACLS, PALS, BLS, or NRP due to expire or do you need the full Provider class? We have lots of NO STRESS classes throughout California everyday as well as, the only AHA online BLS, AHA online ACLS, and AHA online PALS that will get you an AHA card.
New!! New!! Online ACLS & PALS Prep Courses: We have 2 new video based prep courses for ACLS & PALS. These are the best courses we have ever seen. Get your CE cert as soon as you complete the class online. No waiting. CA BRN Provider #13886.
ACLS & PALS Course Prep Course #1 Underlying Causes of Cardiac Arrest H's & T's covers the10 most common underlying causes of cardiac arrest and how to treat them. It integrates the Guidelines 2010 algorithms with the most recent science and treatment protocols. If you need a refresher before taking either ACLS or PALS this online video is the best course we have found. This course offers 3 hours CE. CA BRN Provider #13886
Register Now for "Underlying Causes of Cardiac Arrest, H's & T's" Click on Control and click on link to go to class.
ECG for Everyone ACLS & PALS Prep Course #2
This course teaches how an ECG pattern is generated, normal sinus rhythms, and identifying characteristics of the most common arrhythmias taught in ACLS and PALS. It integrates this knowledge with the Guidelines 2010 algorithms. This video based course we have found for teaching how to read ECG's and the basic ACLS algorithms. It works well as a stand alone prep for ACLS & PALS or partners well with "Underlying Causes of Cardiac Arrest" to give a complete prep for ACLS or PALS. This course offers 4 hours CE. CA BRN Provider #13886
Register Now for ECG for Everyone Click on Control and click on link to go to class

NEW ACLS & PALS Prep Courses Featured on our Website
If you need a little help preparing for your upcoming ACLS or PALS class check out our website, www.nationalhearted.com and click on the "Online CE" page for some great NEW ONLINE CE courses. ACLS Prep and PALS Prep cover how to identify the EKGs needed so that you can use the algorithms appropriately. They are great for not only preparing for your ACLS or PALS class but also, for follow-up to reinforce what you learn at the class. There are also, some great online courses about stroke.
**********
Do you need even more help to prepare for your ACLS or PALS class?
If you want a text that covers not only what to do during a code, check out the ACLS In Depth and PALS In Depth Home study Courses available at www.nationalhearted.com . Get CE credit for being the best prepared student in the class. Also, available, buy just the textbook as a reference text: ACLS Study Guide and PALS Study Guide. These textbooks have all details on why as well as what to do during resuscitation. Go to our product page Buy Books and Products Now to buy the ACLS and PALS Study Guides and go to the Home Study CE to get the ACLS In Depth and PALS In Depth home study courses good for Nursing CE. CA Provider #13886.
Earn Extra Money in Your Spare Time as an AHA Instructor
Nurses, Paramedics, EMTs, & Respiratory Therapists—Become an American Heart Association Instructor and teach for us in your spare time or start your own business teaching AHA classes. It is easy to get started quickly and be qualified to start teaching AHA courses for us. If you decide to start your own business we will be happy to mentor and assist you to be successful. Call us at 909-824-0400 or go online to Become an AHA Instructor to get started making good money in your spare time today.
New AHA Guidelines
Here is a summary of Guidelines 2010 published today October 18, 2010 by the American Heart Association. We will be sending out another newsletter in a week or two with more details. For now, here is a summary of the major changes to the BLS, ACLS, & PALS algorithms.
http://www.nationalhearted.com/2010_aha_guidelines.html
Is Your AHA ACLS, PALS, BLS, or NRP due to expire or do you need the full Provider class? We have lots of NO STRESS classes throughout California everyday as well as, the only AHA online BLS, AHA online ACLS, and AHA online PALS that will get you an AHA card.
November’s FREE CE Course-back by popular demand
Water, Dehydration, & Risk Factors for Chronic Disease
Presented by:
National Institute for Healthcare Education
1280 E. Cooley Ste. 12, Colton, CA 92324
This course has been approved for 2 hours Continuing Education for nurses. CA Provider #13886.
Copyright © 2010 by National Institute for Healthcare Education (NIHE)
All Rights Reserved. Reproduction and distribution of these materials are prohibited without the
express written authorization of National Institute for Healthcare Education (NIHE)
First Published: July, 2010
Acknowledgements:
National Institute for Healthcare Education acknowledges the valuable contributions of:
Linnea Stonebraker R.N., Ph.D After more than three decades serving in critical care, nursing education, and administration she is the Program Director for National Institute for Healthcare Education, one of the premier American Heart Association Training Centers on the West Coast. She is Regional Faculty for American Heart Association for BLS, ACLS, and PALS and is a Regional Trainer for the American Academy of Pediatrics for NRP. She travels the country teaching classes in Resuscitation Science and on how to reduce the risk from the Lifestyle Diseases: heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, osteoporosis, and stroke.
Contents:
Acknowledgements
Purpose and Objectives
Introduction
Dehydration
Risk In Elderly Populations
Over hydration Risk
Water Consumption Related to Risk Factor for Many Chronic Diseases
Adequate Water Intake Plan
Purpose and Objectives
The purpose of Water, Dehydration, and Risk Factors of Chronic Disease is to understand the benefits of adequate water consumption resulting in the reduction of heart disease, obesity, and other chronic diseases.
After successful completion of the course the participant will be able to:
•   Define mild dehydration.
•   List at least 10 symptoms of mild dehydration.
•   Describe the effect of dehydration on the elderly and how it differs from younger populations.
•   Identify at least to causes of increased risk of dehydration in the elderly as compared to young populations.
•    Discuss the risk from over hydration and recommendations for prevention.
Can drinking water reduce your risk of heart disease, obesity, and cancer?
Introduction
Water is found everywhere in our body, from the aorta to the zygoma. By percentage by weight an adult body is more than 60% water. Certain tissues have an even higher percentage. Our brain is about 70% water and our lungs contain up to 90% water.
Water is a cleansing agent in our body as it is the “universal solvent” since many compounds can be dissolved in water and thus put into solution. Blood, for example, is approximately 83% water. The remainder consists of blood cells, nutrients, and hormones. Without water, the blood becomes too concentrated or sticky. We will discuss later the consequences of this and how adequate water supply can reduce the risks associated with “concentrated blood”.
Dehydration
The body has a built in defense mechanism to protect vital organs from periods of inadequate water. The body takes water from less vital areas and shifts it to the brain, heart, and other organs. Unfortunately, many people live their entire lives in this partially dehydrated condition. This can result in premature aging, stress on kidneys, arthritis, and many other health problems. 75% of Americans are chronically dehydrated and in 37% of them the thirst sensation is so impaired that it is mistaken for hunger.
Mild dehydration is defined as a 1 to 3 percent reduction in body weight as a result of fluid loss. Some symptoms of mild dehydration are: headache, fatigue, confusion, loss of appetite, flushed skin, heat intolerance, light-headedness, dry mouth and eyes, lack of skin elasticity, stomach pains (some people confuse this for hunger), and a slower metabolism which can result in weight gain.
Dehydration can become more serious if not reversed. If unchecked, dehydration can lead to a worsening of these symptoms and can progress to heat exhaustion, characterized by nausea and vomiting, which will in turn make the dehydration worse. In times of elevated environmental temperatures this progression can happen very quickly. Severe dehydration is life-threatening and must be reversed as soon as possible. It is very easy to become dehydrated. Going one day without adequate water can cause moderate dehydration. Going two days without water can result in a life-threatening case of dehydration.
Risk in Elderly Populations
Because of the changes in the body that accompany aging, combined with a diminished thirst sensation, elderly people are at much higher risk for dehydration. In fact, severe dehydration is one of the most common reasons for hospitalizations of the elderly. This problem seems to increase with age. In one study the age group over 85 years of age is six times more likely to be hospitalized for dehydration than that age 65 to 69. In the elderly, dehydration can easily progress to the untreatable stage: among those hospitalized with dehydration, an estimated 18% will die within 30 days despite medical treatment.
Over hydration Risk
Is it possible to drink too much water? It is rare, but it can happen. Too much water can cause low blood sodium levels and lead to cerebral edema. Several years ago, the U. S. Army reported losing a number of soldiers to this condition. They currently recommend drinking no more 6 eight-ounce glasses of water per hour and no more than 50 glasses in any one day.
Water Consumption Related to Risk Factor for Many Chronic Diseases
Since most Americans, are on the other end of the spectrum when it comes to water consumption, let’s look at the studies relating to water consumption that are closer to what we actually consume. A recent study, entitled “Adventist Health Study #1” that included more than 20,000 participants discovered that men who drank more than 5 eight-ounce glasses of water per day cut their risk of heart disease by 46%. The number was even greater for women: 59% reduction in their risk of heart disease.
Water is the original “zero calorie” beverage and is the perfect choice for diabetics as it contains no sugar to raise blood glucose. When blood sugar increases the body excretes water as the blood sugar rises. This leads to the thirst sensation that many diabetics experience as their blood sugars rise.
One study found that individuals with orthostatic hypotension were able to tolerate position changes after drink just one to two glasses of water. Further study determined that the increase in blood volume was not the main cause of this effect. Drinking water was determined to have a vasopressor effect without causing hypertension.
Another study reported that adequate water intake reduced the incidence of colon cancer in men by 92%. The study mentioned above that had over 20,000 participants over more than a decade showed that five glasses of water per day reduce the risk of breast cancer in women by 79%. Bladder cancer risk has been shown to be reduced by 51% by drinking adequate water.
Non-water beverages do not show the same health benefits as those mentioned here for water. In fact, research has shown that women who consume large quantities of non-water beverages increased their risk of a fatal heart attack by 2 ½ times. The same study showed an increase for men of 50%.
An added benefit of drinking water is burning of unwanted calories. A study to determine water's effect on metabolism discovered that, after drinking about two glasses of water, participant's metabolic rates increased by an average of 30%. The change in metabolism started after 10 minutes and lasted over an hour! The surveyors believe than an increase in water intake of six glasses per day has the potential to burn the energy equivalent of about five pounds of fat per year.
The kidneys are sophisticated filters that process about 200 quarts of blood each day to sift out about 2 quarts of waste products. The only substance that properly cleans the kidneys is water. According to the National Kidney Research Fund, increasing water intake to approximately eight glasses a day is the best way to insure proper kidney function, avoid kidney stones, flush impurities from the blood and protect against urinary tract infections.
Drinking adequate water every day can significantly reduce back joint pain. When the sacs that cushion our joints become dehydrated as the body pulls water from them to supply our vital organs during times of dehydration, the joints are not adequately cushioned and movement becomes painful. In fact, in some studies, moderate and severe dehydration actually mimicked dehydration.
Water plays an extremely important role in brain function. The brain is 1/50th of the total body weight but receives 18 to 20% of the total blood circulation. When dehydration occurs neurotransmission and brain function are compromised. Confusion and slow reflexes are the result. Water can help keep your gall bladder clean. In a recent study, researchers found that drinking adequate room temperature water resulted in gallbladder emptying. Furthermore, low daily water intake has been cited as a factor in the formation of gallstones.
Adequate Water Intake Plan
As you can see there are significant benefits to getting adequate water every day. According to these studies drinking at least 5 glasses a day of water results in dramatic drops in the risk factors associated with heart disease, cancer, obesity and other serious illnesses.
A suggested program to insure adequate water consumption is this. Drink a glass of water before every meal and one in the morning and one at night. This is an easy program to adopt and the pay-off is huge! That will give you the minimum of five glasses and you too, can start reaping the drop in your risk for heart disease, obesity, and cancer.

References
1.    Archives of Internal Medicine, July 1992 “The Adventist Health Study”.
2.   Fraser, Gary. Diet, Life Expectancy, and Chronic Disease, Oxford University Press, 2003.
3.   Chan, Jacqueline, et al. Water, Other Fluids, and Fatal Coronary Disease, American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 155, No. 9:827-833.
Please Read:
This publication is intended solely for the use of healthcare professionals taking this course, for credit, from NIHE. It is designed to assist healthcare professionals, including nurses, in addressing many issues
associated with healthcare. The guidance provided in this publication is general in nature, and is not designed to address any specific situation. This publication in no way absolves facilities of their responsibility for the appropriate orientation of healthcare professionals. Hospitals or other organizations using this publication as a part of their own orientation processes should review the contents of this publication to ensure accuracy and compliance before using this publication. Hospitals and facilities that use this publication agree to defend and indemnify, and shall hold NIHE including its parent(s), subsidiaries, affiliates, officers/directors, and employees from liability resulting from the use of this publication. The contents of this publication may not be reproduced in any form without written permission from NIHE.
Water Dehydration and Risk Factors for Chronic Disease Posttest
1.    By percentage the adult human body is more than _____ water.
a.    60%
b.   70%
c.   80%
d.   90%
2.    The human brain is about _____ water.
a.   50%
b.   60%
c.   70%
d.   80%
3.    Dehydration can result in premature aging.
a.    True
b.   False
4.    Mild dehydration is defined as a ____ to _____ percent reduction on weight as a result of fluid loss
a.    5% to 7%
b.   1% to 3%
c.   10% to 12%
d.   15% to 17%
5.    Headache, fatigue, confusion, loss of appetite, flushed skin, heat intolerance, dry mouth and eyes, lack of skin elasticity, stomach pain, and a slower metabolism are signs of:
a.    Severe dehydration
b.   Moderate dehydration
c.   Over Hydration
d.   Mild Dehydration
6.    Going one day without water can cause severe dehydration.
a.    True
b.   False
7.    Because of the changes that come with age dehydration is not as much a concern in the elderly as it is in younger populations
a.    True
b.   False
8.   One study found that individuals with orthostatic hypotension were able to tolerate position changes after drink just __________glasses of water.
a.   1 to 2
b.   3 to 4
c.   5 to 6
d.   7 to 8
9.   Drinking two glasses of water will increase the metabolism for up to an hour by _____%.
a.    10%
b.   15%
c.   25%
d.   30%
10.    Studies show that drinking adequate water can dramatically reduce the risk of breast, bladder, and colon cancer.
a.    True
b.   False

Water Dehydration and Risk Factors for Chronic Disease Posttest
To get 2 hours CE (CA Provider #13886) for taking this course you must fill in the following and email it to nihe@earthlink.net You must get a score of 80% in order to pass.
Date_________________________________________________
Name________________________________________________
Address______________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
Email________________________________________________
Phone_______________________________________________
RN License #_________________________________________
1.______ 2.______ 3.______ 4.______ 5.______ 6.______
7.______ 8.______ 9.______ 10.______




November’s Coupon
Get $20 off of any ACLS course registered online before Dec. 7, 2012. Enter the code: Christmas into the discount code field when you register online.
*The American Heart Association strongly promotes knowledge & proficiency in BLS, ACLS, & PALS & has developed instructional materials for this purpose. Use of these materials in an educational course does not represent course sponsorship by the American Heart Association. Any fees charged for such a course, except for a portion of fees needed for AHA course material, do not represent income to the Association.
You are receiving this newsletter free of charge as a customer of National Institute for Healthcare Education. If you wish to unsubscribe please send an email to unsubscribe@nationalhearted.com.


#1 ACLS Review/ Prep Course:  www.MasterACLS.com 

This site has a complete ACLS Algorithms knowledge library, hundreds of practice ACLS questions that mirror the actual ACLS exam, flashcards, dozens of video lectures, practice megacodes, complete ACLS pharmacology, megacode video simulator with lots of scenarios and much more!  You even get nursing CE for completing all the activities.  For less than $14 you can do a fast review or complete in-depth study.  This is the best ACLS Prep/Review site available today.

800-773-8895

*The American Heart Association strongly promotes knowledge & proficiency in BLS, ACLS, & PALS & has developed instructional materials for this purpose.  Use of these materials in an educational course does not represent course sponsorship by the American Heart Association.  Any fees charged for such a course, except for a portion of fees needed for AHA course material, do not represent income to the Association.